Hydration – conception and pregnancy diet

Hydration – conception and pregnancy diet

Image source wikipedia.org, author: José Manuel Suárez 

Hydrating your body properly with sufficient healthy drinks is crucial for effective organ functioning, including human reproductive system.

Why is water so important?

Up to 80% of the human body is water. Every cell, tissue, and organ needs water to function the right way. For examples, the human circulatory system depends on blood to transport nutrients, wastes, oxygen, carbon dioxide and hormones; The liver and the kidneys use water to help excrete toxins and harmful compounds that we consume or produce; Water helps joints to maintain proper lubrication; When more sodium is consumed than necessary ( that is common for most American), water is used to help remove extra sodium from the body;  Water also helps to regulate body temperature.

Human reproductive system needs water to function properly.

  • Hormonal imbalance is an important cause of infertility. Water stimulates blood flow which helps hormone transportation.
  • The healthy egg needs sufficient blood supply.
  • Sperms swim in cervical fluid/mucus to reach the egg. Cervical factor causes 5-10% of women infertility. Overall body hydration maintains healthy cervical fluid level.
  • 98% of semen is water. Dehydration may cause lower semen production.
  • Women body weight increases about 12 kg during an average pregnancy. Most of this added weight is water. Sufficient water intake is needed for healthy fetus development and growth.
  • Pregnancy hormone deficiency has linked to childhood diseases, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, pervasive developmental problems, externalising behavior, in addition to epilepsy and seizure

How much water do we need to drink daily?

Dehydration has linked to some chronic diseases. The Institute of Medicine has recommended adequate intake (AI) values for total water at levels to prevent deleterious, primarily acute, effects of dehydration, which include metabolic and functional abnormalities The AI for total water (from a combination of drinking water, beverages, and food) is set based on the median total water intake from U.S. survey data. The AI for total water intake for young men and women (ages 19 to 30 years) is 3.7 L and 2.7 L per day, respectively. For women in pregnancy AI is 3.0 L per day, and for women during lactation AI is 3.8 L per day. Detailed AI for each group is cited from “Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate”

AI for Women
19–50 years 2.7 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 2.2 L (≈ 9 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.

 

AI for Men
19–50 years 3.7 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 3.0 L (≈ 13 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.

 

AI for Children
1–3 years 1.3 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 0.9 L (≈ 4 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
4–8 years 1.7 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 1.2 L (≈ 5 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
AI for Boys
9–13 years 2.4 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 1.8 L (≈ 8 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
14–18 years 3.3 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 2.6 L (≈ 11 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.
AI for Girls
9–13 years 2.1 L/day of total water. This includes approximately 1.6 L (≈ 7 cups) as total beverages, including drinking water.

 

AI for Infants
0–6 months 0.7 L/day of water, assumed to be from human milk.
7–12 months 0.8 L/day of total water, assumed to be from human milk, complementary foods and beverages. This includes approximately 0.6 L (≈ 3 cups) as total fluid, including formula or human milk, juices, and drinking water.

 

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The information on this Web site is not intended to be a substitute for informed medical advice or care. You should not use this information to diagnose or treat any health problems or illnesses without consulting your pediatrician or family doctor. Please consult a doctor with any questions or concerns you might have regarding your or your child’s condition.

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